The Resource American Africans in Ghana: : Black expatriates and the civil rights era, Kevin K. Gaines, (ebook)

American Africans in Ghana: : Black expatriates and the civil rights era, Kevin K. Gaines, (ebook)

Label
American Africans in Ghana: : Black expatriates and the civil rights era
Title
American Africans in Ghana:
Title remainder
Black expatriates and the civil rights era
Statement of responsibility
Kevin K. Gaines
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
In 1957 Ghana became one of the first sub-Saharan African nations to gain independence from colonial rule. Over the next decade, hundreds of African Americans--including Martin Luther King Jr., George Padmore, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Pauli Murray, and Muhammad Ali--visited or settled in Ghana. Kevin K. Gaines explains what attracted these Americans to Ghana and how their new community was shaped by the convergence of the Cold War, the rise of the U.S. civil rights movement, and the decolonization of Africa. Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana's president, posed a direct challenge to U.S. hegemony by promoting a vision of African liberation, continental unity, and West Indian federation. Although the number of African American expatriates in Ghana was small, in espousing a transnational American citizenship defined by solidarities with African peoples, these activists along with their allies in the United States waged a fundamental, if largely forgotten, struggle over the meaning and content of the cornerstone of American citizenship--the right to vote--conferred on African Americans by civil rights reform legislation.When the West African nation of Ghana gained its independence from British colonial rule in 1957, people of African descent the world over celebrated the new nation as a beacon for their aspirations for freedom and self-determination. Over the next decade, hundreds of African Americans including Martin Luther King Jr., George Padmore, W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Pauli Murray, C. L. R. James, and Muhammad Ali--visited or settled in Ghana. Kevin K. Gaines explains what attracted these expatriates to Ghana and how their new community was shaped by the convergence of the Cold War, the rise of the U.S. civil rights movement, and the decolonization of Africa
Member of
Cataloging source
Midwest
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Gaines, Kevin Kelly
Dewey number
324.089/960730667
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
hoopla digital
Series statement
The John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • African Americans
  • Electronic books
  • Ghana
  • Civil rights movements
Target audience
adult
Label
American Africans in Ghana: : Black expatriates and the civil rights era, Kevin K. Gaines, (ebook)
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Color
multicolored
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Governing access note
Digital content provided by hoopla
Isbn
9780807867822
Isbn Type
(electronic bk.)
Publisher number
MWT11711485
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
11711485
System control number
MWT11711485
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Label
American Africans in Ghana: : Black expatriates and the civil rights era, Kevin K. Gaines, (ebook)
Link
Publication
Color
multicolored
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Governing access note
Digital content provided by hoopla
Isbn
9780807867822
Isbn Type
(electronic bk.)
Publisher number
MWT11711485
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
11711485
System control number
MWT11711485
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web

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